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How to Drop the Oil Pan in a Mazda 6

by Contributor; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • Jack and jack stands

  • Wrench

  • Oil drip pan

  • Separator tool

How to Drop the Oil Pan in a Mazda 6. The Mazda 6, or Mazda Atenza, as it is called, is a mid-sized car that has been in production since 2002. The most common generation is the first generation which has model numbers from years 2002 through 2007. Of these models, the Mazda Speed 6 is the most common engine type found in these vehicles. Here's how to drop the oil pan in these vehicles if there is damage to it.

Drive the Mazda 6 onto a flat surface with plenty of room to work around and under safely.

Open the hood of the vehicle and remove the negative battery cable using a wrench. The negative battery cable is located on the battery, at the very front of the vehicle, on the left side. Use a wrench to disconnect the cable and set aside.

Locate the engine under cover and remove using a wrench. Remove the right front wheel next, to gain access to the oil and oil pan.

Place an oil drip pan under the oil pan, which is located between the tires, towards the right of the vehicle, and looks like a rectangular, metal pan. Use a wrench to unscrew the oil drain plug from the back of the oil pan, which allows oil to flow from the oil pan into the oil drip pan you've put in position.

Remove the engine front cover using a wrench. Then, remove the dipstick tube pipe and the o-ring using a wrench. Each is located around the oil pan.

Unscrew each of the bolts that line the edge of the oil pan using a crisscross process; remove one bolt from one side of the pan then remove the opposite bolt on the opposite side of the pan. Support the pan with one hand to keep it from falling.

Use a separator tool to separate the oil pan from the engine, if necessary. Be careful not to damage the gasket, or to replace the damaged gasket with a new one before replacing the oil pan.

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