Honda XR 200 Specifications

by Andrew Cohen

Honda, the Japanese motor company, started making motorcycles in 1948 as Japan began to recover from World War II. Honda first produced dirt bikes in the late 1960s, and today they produce some of the most popular models on the market. Honda's XR series has been around since the manufacturer started making dirt bikes. The XR 200 was discontinued in the North American market after the 2002 model year, but is still in production overseas.

Engines Specifications

The 2010 Honda XR 200, which is sold in the Philippines, has a four-stroke, single-cylinder engine. This engine's cylinder bore has a diameter of 2.5 inches and a stroke piston length of 2.4 inches. The size of this engine is 196.9 cubic centimeters. This engine's compression ratio is 9 to 1. The valve train is an overhead camshaft that controls two valves. The XR 200's engine features a capacitor discharge ignition system as well as an electric push start.

Performance Specifications

The 2010 XR 200 features a double cradle frame. This dirt bike can produce a maximum of 16 horsepower at 8,000 revolutions per minute. The torque rating of this bike is 13 foot-pounds at 6,500 revolutions per minute. The front suspension of the XR 200 is telescopic type, while the rear suspension is a pro-link. The front brake is a hydraulic disc and the rear brake is a mechanical leading trailing style brake.

Dimensions and Other Information

The 2010 Honda XR 200 is 84 inches long, 33 inches wide and stands 46.2 inches tall. The dry weight of this bike is 255.2 pounds. The dry weight reflects the weight of the bike with no gasoline or necessary fluids. The XR 200's seat sits 33.7 inches off the ground and it has a wheelbase that is 54.1 inches wide. The ground clearance of this bike is 11.5 inches.

About the Author

Andrew Cohen is an aspiring writer from New Jersey who focuses on international relations and political theory. He has been writing seriously for over five years. His bachelor's degree is in political science with a minor in history.

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