How to Flush a Nissan Altima's Air Conditioning System

by Lee Sallings

The most common cause of premature failure in a new A/C compressor in your Nissan Altima is not removing particles that are introduced into the system when the original compressor fails. These particles make their way into the new compressor and cause damage to the unit as they pass through it. Flushing the system isn't difficult but does require compressed air and the proper use of A/C flush chemicals. This process can be completed in a few hours and will help prevent damage to new parts in the air conditioning system.

Evacuate the system of all refrigerant. This service is available at most auto repair shops and must be done by a certified professional technician.

Disconnect the A/C lines from the compressor by removing the two 10 mm bolts with a socket and ratchet. Remove the 10 mm bolt that attaches the high-pressure A/C line to the condenser in the front passenger side of the engine compartment and unplug the line.

Fill the lines and condenser with flush chemical by pouring with a small funnel. Use compressed air to blow the chemical through and out of the condenser and hoses. Use shop rags to catch any debris and excess chemicals as they discharge through the other sides of the parts and hoses.

Flush the system until debris stops coming out of the parts. Reinstall the hoses onto the compressor and condenser using new rubber O-ring seals. Tighten the bolts securely.

Warnings

  • close Wear safety glasses and work gloves to prevent serious injuries.
  • close It is illegal to vent any kind of refrigerant into the atmosphere. If the air conditioning system in your car still contains refrigerant, have a qualified repair technician remove it prior to making repairs.

Items you will need

About the Author

Lee Sallings is a freelance writer from Fort Worth, Texas. Specializing in website content and design for the automobile enthusiast, he also has many years of experience in the auto repair industry. He has written Web content for eHow, and designed the DIY-Auto-Repair.com website. He began his writing career developing and teaching automotive technical training programs.