Chevy El Camino Specs

by Karen Taylor

The El Camino was produced by Chevrolet and classified as a coupe utility vehicle. It had the appearance of a truck, yet had many car-like features. Chevy launched this car-truck hybrid vehicle to be a competitor for the Ford Ranchero. It can sometimes be found in the muscle car category. It was produced between the years of 1959 and 1960 and again from 1964 to 1987. It's name is Spanish for "the road."

Production

The first generation of El Caminos, 1959 to 1960, was produced in Arlington, Texas. The second, third and fourth generations were produced at plants in Atlanta, Baltimore, Fremont, Calif., Framingham, Mass., Kansas City, Mo. and Oshawa, Ontario. The fifth generation was produced at those U.S. plants plus factories in Mexico and Iran. The El Camino shared several features with the Impala in its early years. After 1964, they were based on the Chevelle and Malibu platforms.

Dimensions

The early El Camino featured a 119-inch wheelbase. That was shortened to about 108 inches around 1978. It was 56.3 inches high and 210.9 inches long. The El Camino's curb weight was about 3,243 pounds.

Engine

El Camino engines were mostly V-8 engines, ranging from a 283-cubic-inch V-8, 170-horsepower engine in 1960 to a 305-cubic-inch V-8, 150-horsepower engine in 1987. In some vehicles, a V-6 engine was also available. On average, the El Camino produced 15 mpg for city driving and 18 mpg on the highway for a combined fuel economy of 16 mpg. The fuel tank could hold about 17 gallons. The car is rear-wheel drive.

Features

The El Camino was produced in numerous colors over the years including Tuxedo Black, Ermine White, Mist Blue, Danube Blue, Willow Green, Cypress Green, Artesian Turquoise, Tahitian Turquoise, Madeira Maroon, Evening Orchid, Regal Red, Sierra Tan, Cameo Beige and Crocus Yellow. Interior colors included Fawn, Blue or Red. It had two doors. Otherwise, the car was typically loaded with options for buyers to choose from. Those features included bucket seats, power windows, tachometer, a simulated wood-rim wheel, spotlamps and all-vinyl trim on the interior.

About the Author

Karen Taylor is a visual journalist, page designer and horse-lover in central Indiana. She designs pages for an area newspaper including feature pages and page A1. She has had a passion for journalism her entire life and enjoys both the design and writing aspects of the industry. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Ball State University in visual journalism.