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The 1977 Dodge Power Wagon W200 Specs

by Christopher Rogers

Introduced after World War II, by 1977 the Dodge Power Wagon had evolved into a light-duty, four-wheel-drive pickup truck. Available in three trim levels, the W200 shared many features with the Dodge Ramcharger pickup and the Warlock, a factory-ordered trick truck.

Engine

A 215-cc six-cylinder engine powered the standard, two-door civilian Power Wagon. A 318-cc V-8 engine was an available upgrade. Both engines were mated to a three- or four-speed manual transmission. All Power Wagon models could be outfitted with automatic transmissions.

Specifications

Capable of handling a payload of 6,481 lbs., Power Wagons sat on a 126-inch wheelbase and featured rugged 10- by 15-inch tires. A military version of the W200, the M880, was a 1-1/4-ton light-duty truck with a standard V-8 engine, a two-speed full-time transfer case, an automatic transmission, Dana axles and four-wheel drum brakes. All Power Wagons had full-time four-wheel drive, which Dodge later switched to part-time.

Trim Levels

Available in Custom, Adventurer and Adventurer SE trim levels, all Power Wagons included two-tone instrument panels, a new grille with rectangular lights and upper-body side molding. Available exterior colors were Black, Dark Green Metallic or Bright Red with gold pinstripes. The 1976 Dodge Warlock was a Power Wagon show vehicle that featured fat tires, bucket seats and oak sideboards. The Warlock was released as a distinct model in 1977.

Macho Package

As part of its "Adult Toys" lineup, Dodge offered a "Macho Package." This package included sporty, chrome-disc or painted-spoke wheels, special paint treatments and custom interiors. With yellow decal stripes, Macho packages offered eight special body colors, as well as black low-gloss hood, cab roof and lower body panels. Dodge applied a Power Wagon decal to the lower body in Super Graphics and installed a 3-inch roll bar in the pickup bed.

About the Author

Based in Boston, Christopher Rogers has been writing arts and technology articles since 1995. His work has appeared in "The Boston Book Review" and on HappyPuppy and Games.com. Rogers was a visiting James Joyce Scholar at Shakespeare & Company's Bloomsday celebrations in Paris. He has studied psychology, comparative literature and philosophy.

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