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How to Change the Brake Pads on a Dodge Ram 2500

by Ryan Bauer

Worn-out brake pads increase your stopping distance and can create hazardous situations, especially when you are towing or hauling heavy loads. The Dodge Ram 2500 has brake pads that you can change yourself, saving you the cost of having the job done by an auto mechanic. Depending on driving conditions and wear patterns, it may be necessary for you to change the pads on all four wheels, or just the front or rear ones.

Place a floor jack under the center of either the front or rear axle, depending on which end you wish to service first. Chock the opposite wheels to keep the truck in place. Pump the jack handle until the tires have cleared the ground. Position two jack stands under the axle, one at each end. Slowly lower the jack until the full weight rests upon the stands. Remove the jack.

Unscrew the lug nuts and set them in a secure location. Pull the wheel off to expose the braking components. Identify the caliper, which surrounds the rotor and contains the brake pads. Remove the bolts holding the caliper in place and pull it off the rotor.

Remove the brake pads, using a screwdriver to pry them out if necessary. Find the piston, which is a metal circle located on the inside part of the caliper. Using firm pressure, push the piston back into the caliper to make room for the new pads. Insert the new pads by reversing the process used to remove the old ones.

Push the caliper back over the rotor and align the bolt holes. Reinstall the bolts, torquing them until they feel firm. Replace the wheel and the lug nuts. Repeat this process to change the brakes on the other side. Lower the Dodge to the ground, and if the other end also requires service, repeat the process.

Tips

  • Brake grease can be used between the pad and the caliper to minimize squealing.
  • If the piston is difficult to press in, a device such as vice grips or a clamp can be used to provide additional pressure.

Warning

  • Inspect your jack and stands before lifting the truck. Never use equipment that appears to be damaged or worn out.

Items you will need

About the Author

Ryan Bauer is a freelance writer located in Ozark, Missouri. He has written numerous articles and books, including "How to Improve Your Credit Score 100 Points in 100 Days." Bauer is an experienced automotive mechanic and computer technician.

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