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How to Change Shocks on a Sport Trac

by Robert Good

When the shocks go out on your Sport Trac, you'll need to change them unless you want to sacrifice a lot of comfort while driving. The Sport Trac has 4 different shocks: 2 on the front and 2 on the rear. Each shock is connected to one of the tires and helps to absorb bumps and vibrations while you are driving. This job is not that tough to complete, and all you'll need is a ratchet set and a pair of pliers.

1

Remove the lug nut front the tire with the tire tool. Raise the front end of the Sport Trac with the jack and rest it on jack stands. Remove the tire from the frame and set the tire aside.

2

Locate the lower control area on the Sport Trac. You'll find the shock connected to the axle. The shock is the metal piece that is in the middle of the big spring going from the axle to the upper frame.

3

Slide the jack under the axle and raise the jack to support the weight of the axle. You'll need this support as you disconnect the shock from the axle.

4

Locate the bolt and nut that is connecting the shock to the axle. Grab the nut with the pliers while using the ratchet set to unscrew the bolt. Remove the bolt from the shock.

5

Remove the bolt securing the upper shock to the frame by grabbing the nut with the pliers and using the ratchet set to unscrew the bolt. Remove the bolt from the shock. Slide the shock out from the spring.

6

Slide the new shock in the upper and lower fitting, then replace the bolt and nut. Tighten the bolt and nut using the pliers and ratchet set. Replace the tire to the frame. Use the jack to remove the jack stands and lower the Sport Trac back to the ground and replace the lug nut. Tighten the lug nuts.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Living in Tucson, Ariz., Robert Good has been writing from 2003 on a wide variety of subjects ranging from sports, gardening and cooking to auto repair, home maintenance and travel. Good holds a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of the State of New York.

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