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How to Get the CD Out of a GM Radio

by Cassandra Tribe

The stock radio/CD player in most GM vehicles is made by Delco. These units can make it very difficult to remove a stuck CD. Your Delco radio may be flashing cryptic error messages or just not working at all, but there are a couple of methods you can try to remove the disc. None of them will damage your Delco CD player.

Open up the fuse box on your GM vehicle (consult your vehicle manual for the exact location). Reading either the fuse diagram label on the fuse box cover or the fuse diagram in the manual locate the fuse for the Delco radio. Pull the fuse from the box, wait 5 minutes (for stored power in the radio to discharge) and re-insert the fuse. Turn your radio on and eject the CD. If your CD does not eject, go on to the next step.

Load another CD into the player. When you attempt to do this the player will "refuse" to be double loaded and this may trigger it to eject the CD that is stuck in the player. If it does not, go to the next step.

Wrap a piece of duct tape around the blade of a butter knife (a thin, dull bladed knife). Just wrap it once and no more, or the tape will become too thick to pass through the slot. Stick the blade into the CD slot and press down. The tape will stick to the CD and you will be able to pull it far enough out to pinch the CD and pull it completely free. If you use this method you must immediately afterward clean the CD player to remove any residue from inside. If this does not work, you must have the radio professionally serviced to remove the CD.

Tip

  • Clean the CD player in your GM vehicle often to prevent dust and debris from gumming up the inner workings and your CDs from becoming stuck.

Warning

  • Removing the faceplate on your GM Delco Radio or otherwise dismantling it can void the warranty on the radio. If your radio is still under warranty, take it in to an authorized dealer to have the CD removed.

Items you will need

About the Author

Cassandra Tribe has worked in the construction field for over 17 years and has experience in a variety of mechanical, scientific, automotive and mathematical forms. She has been writing and editing for over 10 years. Her areas of interest include culture and society, automotive, computers, business, the Internet, science and structural engineering and implementation.

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