How to Apply Car Window Decals

by Gryphon Adams

Get the best results when applying car window decals by following expert tips. Whether you are applying a small decal such as a college sticker or parking permit or adhering a large rear window graphic, choosing the right tools, in the best weather conditions, and taking plenty of time will assure effective decal application.

1

Pick the right conditions. Apply the decal on a warm, dry day or in the garage. Excessive heat or cold affects the adhesive. Choose temperatures between 50 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit for car window decal application. (See Reference 1)

2

Clean the glass with mild soap and water. Use a lint-free cloth (such as microfiber or a lens cleaner for cameras or eyeglasses) to dry window to assure no lint or dust specks get on the decal.

3

Assemble the right tools for the job: masking tape, squeegee (or credit card) and a knife.

4

Put the decal where you want it. Put masking tape across the top of the decal to hold it to the window.

5

Use the squeegee or credit card to press the backing. T&L Ink Custom Window Decals advises: "Use overlapping strokes to apply, starting at the top center and working down and toward each edge." (See Reference 2) Use a smooth, slow stroke. Go over the entire backing.

6

Watch as you peel off the backing. If any of the decal lifts off the glass, press it back down with the knife. Press all of the backing again with the squeegee or credit card. Go slower and use more pressure. Remove the backing and the decal is set.

Tips

  • check Go slowly and apply a bit of the decal at a time to reduce the risk of air bubbles.
  • check Don't use any chemical product (such as glass cleaner) on the window; it could damage the decal.

Warnings

  • close Check laws for your area before applying large window decals. These are prohibited in some places.
  • close Don't attempt exterior window decal application (such as rear window graphics) in windy conditions.

Items you will need

About the Author

Gryphon Adams began publishing in 1985. He contributed to the "San Francisco Chronicle" and "Dark Voices." Adams writes about a variety of topics, including teaching, floral design, landscaping and home furnishings. Adams is a certified health educator and a massage practitioner. He received his Master of Fine Arts at San Francisco State University.

Photo Credits

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