Tips for Getting Rid of Air Bubbles in a Vinyl Sticker on a Car

by Bonnie Conrad

Vinyl window stickers can be an ideal way to enhance the beauty of your car and show off your personal taste and style. Unlike bumper stickers, which can be difficult to remove, vinyl window stickers can easily be removed and replaced as you see fit. This makes it easy to change the look of your car whenever the mood strikes you.

Keep It Clean

One of the most common problems with not only vinyl window stickers but window tinting film and other vinyl accessories is the tendency for air bubbles to form under the vinyl. These air bubbles greatly detract from the look of the stickers, and, if left unattended, those air bubbles can cause the vinyl stickers to fall off the window. One of the best ways to prevent air bubbles from forming is to make sure the windows are spotlessly clean before applying the vinyl sticker. Even a small amount of dirt can interfere with the adhesion of the window cling and allow air bubbles to form. If air bubbles have formed under a currently installed vinyl window sticker, remove it and clean the window thoroughly.

Apply Heat

Adding heat during the installation process can prevent air bubbles from forming. Heat can also remove air bubbles that have accumulated under the vinyl stickers and window clings you already have installed. A hair dryer works wonderfully for this purpose. Simply applying the heat from the hair dryer to the vinyl sticker as it is being applied (or reapplied) can smooth out those air pockets and give you a better result.

Use the Right Tool

Simply smoothing out the vinyl sticker with the large flat surface of an ice scraper is a handy way to remove any air bubbles that have accumulated. An ice scraper is also a useful tool when installing the sticker for the first time. Simply peel off the backing bit by bit, press the sticker to the window and use the ice scraper to press it into place. Installing the window cling or vinyl sticker in this way will help it adhere more firmly to the window; this can help reduce the chances of air bubbles forming down the line.

About the Author

Based in Pennsylvania, Bonnie Conrad has been working as a professional freelance writer since 2003. Her work can be seen on Credit Factor, Constant Content and a number of other websites. Conrad also works full-time as a computer technician and loves to write about a number of technician topics. She studied computer technology and business administration at Harrisburg Area Community College.