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How to Adjust the Door on a Chevy S-10

by Don Kress

Door adjustment on non-adjustable Chevrolet S-10 doors is deceptively simple. Over time, you will find that your doors no longer close properly. Perhaps they strike the door jamb incorrectly or ride up over the striker bolt. This is caused by passengers or drivers entering and exiting the vehicle and placing their weight on the armrest or the door frame itself. While it may not seem like much, in truth, over the course of a vehicle's 10-year span, the doors actually take quite a lot of abuse. Thankfully, repositioning the doors to close correctly is a rather simple process.

Open and close the door to get a feel for how much adjustment will be necessary to properly align the door over the striker bolt. Kneel down close to the closing and look inside as you push the door against the striker to get a visual idea of how far the door will have to be adjusted.

Open the door to its first natural stopping point, about half way to being fully open. Position the wooden board under the furthest end of the door, and the end of the board on the top of the door sill. Using a smooth, continuous motion, pull up on the board until the truck's suspension begins to lift slightly. This will shift the door upward. Remove the board and test the closure of the door to ensure that it closes properly.

Replace the board into position and lift again if the door is still too low to properly engage the striker. If the door is too high now, pull down on the door very gently, continually testing the door to be certain that it fits correctly. The process of adjusting the doors is the same on both the passenger and driver's side of the truck.

Tip

  • Use only wood as a lever to adjust the door of the truck, as metal can cause damage to the lower pinch weld of the door.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Don Kress began writing professionally in 2006, specializing in automotive technology for various websites. An Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certified technician since 2003, he has worked as a painter and currently owns his own automotive service business in Georgia. Kress attended the University of Akron, Ohio, earning an associate degree in business management in 2000.

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