How to Replace a Dodge Dakota Window

by Chris Moore

If the one of the windows on your Dodge Dakota truck is cracked or broken, you need to replace it. If the window glass itself is intact but not rolling up or down properly, the problem is likely the regulator. If you need to replace the window glass and/or the regulator, you need to get inside the door by removing the inner trim panel. The exact process can differ depending on the year of the truck and whether or not the door has components like speakers installed.

Removing the Door Panel

Pry off the controls for the power windows using a trim stick. If the Dakota has manual windows, work a cloth between the window crank and the door to disconnect its clip and remove the crank.

Remove the door panel's retaining screws with a screwdriver. Their main locations are along the panel's bottom edge and within the inner door handle.

Pull the door panel upward to release its hooks from the door, then raise it off the door. Disconnect all wiring harness connectors and the handle link rod.

Peel back the plastic water shield on the door and pry the inner weather seal out of the door glass opening.

Remove the door's speaker by removing its mounting screws, lifting it out and disconnecting the electrical connector.

Repairing the Window

Raise the window to where you can access the glass' retaining nuts, then remove the nuts with a wrench (they may require a Torx wrench).

Tilt the glass forward to remove it from the track and then lift it out of the door.

Remove the mounting fasteners for the window regulator, unplug the electrical connector and remove the regulator from the door.

Install the replacement regulator into the door, bolt it to the door and track and connect the electrical connector.

Slide the window glass into the door, fit it into the regulator and track and bolt it in place.

Reconnect the inner trim panel in the reverse order of removal.

Tip

  • check If you need to replace the regulator but not the glass, push the glass up off the frame after removing its bolts and tape it to the door.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Chris Moore has been contributing to eHow since 2007 and is a member of the DFW Writers' Workshop. He received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of Texas-Arlington.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Black car and buildings image by Christopher Dodge from Fotolia.com