How to Add a Husband to a Car Registration and Title

by Julia Fuller

If you have just married, you may want to add your husband to the title and registration of your car. Joint ownership of property is common among married couples. In some cases, having both names on property and accounts allows either spouse to transact business without having a power of attorney.

Take your car title, registration and husband with you to your state's Department of Motor Vehicles to add his name to the title. Both parties must appear in person with valid identification to change a title, or you must provide a power of attorney. The power of attorney must list the vehicle year, make and vehicle identification number (VIN); the signature of person not present; and specific permission for the other person to transfer the title and registration.

Sign off the title where it says signature of seller, and enter the exact vehicle mileage and your current address. NOTE: If there is a lien holder listed on the title, a release of lien is required, or written permission from the lien holder to change the title.

Enter both your name and your husband´s name as purchasers of the vehicle, your current address, signatures and enter a purchase amount of zero. Transfers to immediate family members are not subject to state sales tax.

Present the title, registration and both drivers' licenses to the clerk when called to the counter at the DMV office. Ask to have the title and registration transferred into both names.

Pay the transfer fees. Separate fees are charged for transferring title and transferring registration. Your new title should arrive in the mail within a few weeks. Fees and actual processing time vary by state; please confirm the process for your state by calling your DMV or visiting your state's website.

Tip

  • check If you have a trust set up, you may want your trust listed as the vehicle owner; however, check with your lawyer. A spouse can transfer the title of a car belonging to deceased spouse by signing an affidavit and showing a certified death certificate. Your state's Department of Motor Vehicles may be known by other names, such as the Secretary of State Office.

Warning

  • close Check with your lawyer and insurance company before making a vehicle joint property. Confirm your state's requirements for using a power of attorney to transfer a title and registration by calling your DMV or visiting your state's website.

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About the Author

Julia Fuller began her professional writing career eight years ago covering special-needs adoption. She holds a bachelor's degree in accounting from Marywood College, is co-owner of GJF Rental Properties as well as a livestock and grain crop farm. She worked for the United States Postal Service and a national income tax service.