Thinking about purchasing a new car? Use our new Car Loan Calculator to estimate your monthly car payment!

Toyota Tundra Engine Problems

by Katrina Cornwell

In 2007, numerous reports detailed problems with flaws in the camshafts of some Toyota Tundra engines. Toyota admitted responsibility and promised to pay to replace the failing engines.

Problem in Focus

According to USA Today, the defective engines had broken-down camshafts, one of four essential parts that caused engines to fail entirely or to barely run. Camshafts control the 32 valves that move air and fuel in and out of the engine's combustion chamber. The defects were found in the camshafts controlling the intake valves in at least 20 Toyota Tundras.

Flaws Linked to Subcontractor

Toyota described the flaws as a manufacturing defect by an unidentified subcontractor, according to The Money Times. The damaged camshafts were manufactured for Toyota's Alabama plant, Toyota engineers told Consumer Affairs.

The Solution

Rather than fixing the flaws, Toyota paid for brand-new engines, shipping them to owners via local dealerships, USA Today reported. Replacement engines were free, according to The Money Times.

About the Author

Based in Madison, Tenn., Katrina Cornwell has been writing crime, government and feature articles since 2002. Her articles have appeared in "The Tennessean," "The Dickson Herald" and "The News Examiner." She holds a bachelor's degree from Western Kentucky University.

More Articles

Photo Credits

  • red truck engine image by Christopher Nolan from Fotolia.com