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The Tightening Torque Specifications for a Ford 4.2L

by Anne Davis

Ford began producing its 90-degree, small-block engine family, of which the 4.2 liter is a member, in 1962. These engines are often called Windsors because they were produced in Windsor, Ontario until they were phased out in 2001. The Windsor was gradually phased out when Ford introduced a 4.6 liter modular V8 engine in 1991.

Cylinder Head to Engine Block

The cylinder head bolts to the engine block in a sequence. First, bolt all of the screws to 14 foot-pounds of torque, then to 29 foot-pounds of torque, then to 36 foot-pounds of torque. Then, the long bolts must be loosened to 33 foot-pounds, and the short bolts to 19 foot-pounds of torque. Wait 15 minutes between each step of the sequence to ensure that the bolts have time to stretch and settle before another application of torque.

Engine Block

The front caps of the crankshaft require 88 foot-pounds of torque to bolt to the engine block; the rear caps require 84 foot-pounds of torque. The power steering pump bolts to the engine block with 18 foot-pounds. The thrust-plate-to-engine-block bolts require 8 foot-pounds of torque to tighten properly. The timing chain or belt cover bolts to the engine block with 18 foot-pounds of torque. The water pump requires 5.5 foot-pounds of torque to connect with the engine block.

Crankshaft

The connecting rod bolts to the crankshaft with 29 foot-pounds of torque applied in two steps. The flywheel-to-crankshaft bolts require 60 foot-pounds of torque. The vibration damper or hub requires a torque application of 110 foot-pounds to join with the crankshaft.

Other Specifications

To avoid leaks, the drain plug must receive 11 foot-pounds of torque to join properly with the oil pan. The exhaust manifold requires 30 foot-pounds to join with the cylinder head. The intake manifold bolts to the cylinder head in two steps: first to 4 foot-pounds, then to 8 foot-pounds of torque. The engine block joins with the transmission with 38 foot-pounds of torque. The timing chain or belt sprocket bolts screw to the camshaft with 33 foot-pounds of torque.

About the Author

Anne Davis writes pieces on domestic and international travel, automotive maintenance, education and health. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in English and history, and is pursuing graduate study in a related field.

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