The Starter Clicks on My Hyundai but the Car Won't Start

by John Rose

If the starter is clicking on your Hyundai, it could be the battery, or it may be the starter itself. The best-case scenario is that it's the battery, but even if it is the starter, don't despair. Even an inexperienced person can change the starter out in about 90 minutes. But first let's identify the problem.

Raise the hood of the car and check the battery voltage using a voltage meter while the car is off. The red probe goes on the positive terminal and the black one goes on the negative terminal. A fully charged battery needs to come in at 12.5 to 12.8 volts. Anything less could mean that your battery is not strong enough to power the starter. If the battery is bad, move to the next step. If it is good, move to step 3.

Disconnect the battery from the car, removing the negative terminal first, using a wrench to loosen the nut. Remove the battery retaining bar using a wrench to remove the nut. Lift the battery out of the car and put the new one in. Secure it with the retaining brace. Tighten the nut with the wrench. Reconnect the terminals, connecting the positive terminal first, and then the negative. Tighten the terminal nuts with the wrench.

If your battery was OK, then it's your starter that's bad and you need to replace it. Disconnect the negative battery terminal. Place the wheel chocks behind the rear tires.

Jack the car up on the driver's side using the jack and place a jack stand under the frame near the jacking point. Raise the jack stand up to the frame of the car.

Crawl under the car and find the starter. It's near the transmission and looks like a round canister with electrical wires coming from it. Mark the electrical wires using a marker and masking tape, noting the proper location of each one. Disconnect the shift control cable from the transmission by manipulating it and unhooking it. Remove the speedometer cable, using a wrench to loosen it.

Disconnect the electrical wires from the starter using a wrench to remove the nuts. Unplug the wiring harness, and then remove the mounting bolts from the starter using a ratchet and socket. Pull the starter away from the engine.

Put the new starter on the engine and tighten the mounting bolts with the socket and ratchet. Reconnect the electrical wires, tightening the nuts with the wrench, and then plug in the wiring harness.

Reconnect the speedometer cable to the transmission and tighten it with a wrench. Reconnect the shift cable by hooking it back into the lever. Remove the jack stand from under the car.

Lower the car back to the ground and reconnect the negative battery cable. Tighten the nut with a wrench and then start the car to test the installation.

Tip

  • check Wear safety glasses when working under the car to keep foreign objects from getting in your eyes.

Warning

  • close Never attempt this procedure without first disconnecting the battery as instructed. Severe electrical shock could result if you fail to do so.

Items you will need

About the Author

John Rose has been writing professionally since 1981. Now contributing to various online publications, he specializes in auto repair, home maintenance and similar topics. Rose studied English at Frostburg State University.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera bio battery image by dinostock from Fotolia.com