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Specifications of an LT1 Police Interceptor

by James Rutter

From 1986 to 1996, Chevrolet manufactured a Police Interceptor model of its Caprice for use by law enforcement agencies. The company referred to this version as the 9C1. In 1994, Chevrolet equipped the 9C1 Caprice with a version of its LT1 engine, the same motor used in that year's Corvette sports car. Chevrolet continued to install the LT1 until 1996. After police departments decommissioned these cars, the LT1 interceptors became collector's items.

Drivetrain

Chevrolet equipped the 9C1 Caprice with a version of its eight-cylinder LT1 engine that consisted of an iron block and heads, unlike the Corvette's LT1, which consisted of an iron block and aluminum heads. This engine had a displacement of 5.7 liters (350 cubic inches) and used fuel injection and an overhead valve configuration with two valves per cylinder. These cars used Chevy's 4L60E four-speed automatic transmission to transfer power to the rear wheels.

Performance

The LT1 installed in the 9C1 Caprice could generate 260 horsepower at 5,000 revolutions per minute (rpm) and 330 foot-pounds of torque at 3,200 rpm. Inside each cylinder, this engine achieved a compression ratio of 10.5:1. In comparison, the lighter LT1 installed in the Corvette could crank out 300 horsepower and 340 foot-pounds of torque.

Dimensions

Chevrolet built the 9C1 on its four-door Caprice sedan. This five-passenger car spanned a length of 214.1 inches with a wheelbase of 115.9 inches. The 9C1 Caprice stood 55.7 inches in height and had a width of 77 inches.

Features

Although Chevrolet built the 9C1 on its standard Caprice chassis, it used a thicker, higher-grade steel. Chevrolet also reinforced the front seats with armor plating and installed an additional 12-volt battery under the hood to run police equipment. Each 9C1 used an anti-lock braking system (ABS) and disc brakes on both the front and rear wheels.

About the Author

Since 2005, James Rutter has worked as a freelance journalist for print and Internet publications, including the “News of Delaware County,” “Main Line Times” and Broad Street Review. As a former chemist, college professor and competitive weightlifter, he writes about science, education and exercise. Rutter earned a B.A. in philosophy and biology from Albright College and studied philosophy and cognitive science at Temple University.

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Photo Credits

  • police lights close up image by Matt K from Fotolia.com