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F23 VTEC Specifications

by James Rutter

Japan-based Honda Motors first introduced its VTEC, or Variable Valve Timing and Lift Electronic Control engines in 1989. Honda began manufacturing the F-Series engine as a larger displacement power plant for its Accord and Acura line. The company offered a few different F23 engine configurations that varied between single and dual-overhead cams, but only the F23A1 engine offered the VTEC system.

Identification

Honda's F23 consisted of an iron-aluminum alloy block and aluminum alloy heads. Honda built the F23 as an inline four-cylinder, which aligns all of the cylinders in a single row in the engine block. This engine had a displacement of 2.3 liters, hence the F23 designation. It used a single-overhead cam (SOHC) configuration and electronic fuel injection to funnel fuel through four valves per cylinder, for a total of 16 valves. The F23 VTEC had a bore of 86 mm and a stroke of 97 mm.

Model Availability

Honda installed the F23 VTEC into two of its cars: the Honda Accord and the Acura 2.3 CL. Prospective buyers could choose to upgrade to the F23 VTEC during the 1998-2002 Accord model years. During the 1998 and 1999 model years of the Acura 2.3 CL, Honda offered the F23 VTEC as a premium upgrade.

Performance

Whether installed in the Acura 2.3 CL or the Honda Accord, the F23 cranked out 150 horsepower at 5,700 revolutions-per-minute (rpm) and 152 ft.-lbs. of torque at 4,900 rpm. Inside each cylinder, this engine achieved a compression ratio of 9.3:1. When installed in the Honda Accord, Edmunds reports that the F23 VTEC could accelerate the Accord from 0 to 60 mph in 9.5 seconds. An Acura 2.3 CL with an F23 VTEC went from 0 to 60 mph in 8.6 seconds.

In terms of fuel economy, F23-VTEC-equipped Accords with a manual transmission earned an estimated 22 miles-per-gallon (mpg) during city driving and 28 mpg when driven on the highways. The Acura 2.3 CL's using an F23 VTEC and a manual transmission had a fuel economy of 21 mpg in the city and 29 mpg during highway driving.

About the Author

Since 2005, James Rutter has worked as a freelance journalist for print and Internet publications, including the “News of Delaware County,” “Main Line Times” and Broad Street Review. As a former chemist, college professor and competitive weightlifter, he writes about science, education and exercise. Rutter earned a B.A. in philosophy and biology from Albright College and studied philosophy and cognitive science at Temple University.

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