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Specifications of the Daewoo G25S

by Ken Burnside

Daewoo was one of South Korea's chaebol (large business conglomerates); it went bankrupt in 1999. One of its divisions was Daewoo Heavy Machinery, which was acquired by Doosan Heavy Industries; Doosan subsequently re-badged a number of Daewoo's products, including the G25 series of small forklifts. While finding specifications for the Daewoo G25S can be difficult beyond the very basics, a nearly identical model was released as the Doosan G25; the machines are similar enough that parts from one are readily used on the other.

Power Plant and Fuel Source

The Daewoo G25S uses a 60-horsepower, 3.0-liter 4-cylinder engine manufactured by GM and runs off of pressurized propane. The machine uses a two-week drive train, with a 12-inch wheel base. It has a top speed of 12.4 miles per hour when loaded, and 13.3 miles per hour when unloaded. The gear shift mechanism on this forklift is fully automatic, with one forward gear and one reverse gear.

Dimensions and Weight

The Daewoo G25S is a little over 100 inches long, and 46.1 inches wide. Its overall guard height is 85.9 inches, making it comparatively compact. The small dimensions make the forklift comparatively agile, with a tight turning radius of 89.2 inches.

Capabilities

The G25 forklift has a maximum lift weight of 2.5 tons (5,000 lbs), with the load centered at 24 inches off the ground. The machine's mast (the part of the device that lifts the forks) has a maximum height of 173 inches and is a triple mast design for maximum stability. The most common configuration for this forklift is 48-inch-long pallet forks, suitable for palletized loads. (This is the most common configuration for forklifts, as the 4-foot shipping pallet is a de-facto international standard).

About the Author

Ken Burnside has been writing freelance since 1990, contributing to publications as diverse as "Pyramid" and "Training & Simulations Journal." A Microsoft MVP in Excel, he holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Alaska. He won the Origins Award for Attack Vector: Tactical, a board game about space combat.

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