Specifications on the 1982 International 260 Tractor

by Amanda Gronot

International Harvester introduced its first Farmall tractor in 1924 to compete with the Fordson line. Now known as Navistar, this American agricultural company is one of the leading manufacturers of farming and construction equipment. The 260 is a backhoe/loader tractor, meaning it has a digging arm with a bucket on the rear and a scoop bucket on the front.

Engine

The 260 sports a D-239 diesel engine with four cylinders and a 13.2-liter liquid cooling system. It displaces 3.9 liters and produces 74 horsepower. Its bore is 3.87 inches, and its stroke is 5.06 inches.

Features

The 260 uses either a torque converter transmission with six forward and three reverse gears or a hydrostatic transmission with infinite forward and reverse gears. In the front, this two-wheel drive tractor uses either 11L-16 or 7.50-16 tires, and in the rear, it uses 16.9-24, 14.9-24 or 17.5L-24 tires. It has independent hydraulic wet disc brakes, an 18.5-gallon hydraulic system, an independent rear power-takeoff and hydrostatic power steering.

Dimensions

Weighing 7,972 pounds without the backhoe and 12,000 pounds with it, the 260 has a maximum weight capacity of 26,000 pounds. Its wheelbase is 80.5 inches, and it has a turning radius of 17 to 17.6 feet. It measures 186 inches long without the backhoe or 280 inches long with the backhoe. It is 81 inches wide and 107 inches high, including its roll-over protection structure. The backhoe has a digging depth of 14 inches, a loading height of 12.8 inches and a bucket force of 10,199 pounds. It can reach 18.4 inches from the pivot.

About the Author

In 2008 Amanda Gronot began her professional career as a writer for a research company. She helped ghostwrite a book for a prominent CEO and has had essays and translations published in the prestigious classics journal "Helicon." Gronot graduated with a four-year Master of Arts/Bachelor of Arts in classics from Yale University.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera backhoe shovel image by robert mobley from Fotolia.com