How to Ship a Car to Africa

by Dmitry Rashnitsov

There are several organizations that can help you ship your car to Africa from the United States. The cost is $1,200 to $2,500 depending on the size of the vehicle, the type of container it goes in, and how fast you need it to get there. Making sure the company you are using is reputable is the first priority. Do this by checking company reviews online.

Choosing a company

Choose a company to ship with. The most popular ones are ShipMyVehicle.com, InternationalCarShipping.com, and AutoCarShippers.com. They are all reputable organizations.

Fill out an online car quote form to determine the price of the car shipment and what type of container it will travel in. The organization should return your email with an email or a phone call within two business days. Fill out the online form for all the above business to compare rates.

Decide if you want a "Roll on, roll off" shipment or a container shipment. The RORO will have a person drive your car on a boat in one city and drive it back off in its destination. The container shipment is a 20-foot-wide by 10-foot-tall or a 40-foot-wide by 10-foot-tall container that will be placed on a boat and taken off by a crane. The shipping containers can cost at least $500 to $1,000 more than the RORO method.

Drive your car to the shipping location whether you live near the Atlantic and can take it directly to the ship or if you need to drop it off with a vendor that will use a car transporter to get it to the Eastern seaboard. Pay the shipping company the amount agreed upon.

Say goodbye to your car as it sets sail to Africa. Wait for the confirmation that the car has arrived at its destination. Pick up your car in person in Africa or notify the person picking it up that it has arrived.

Tip

  • check Remember to take out all the valuables from your vehicle before you give it to the shipping company. Also don't forget to shop around with several companies to get the best deal.

Warning

  • close Be aware of scams and companies whose rates are very low. You may be putting your car in the wrong hands. Some scams include companies taking your vehicle and you never hearing from them again. Another scam has a company saying your car was damaged in shipment and forcing you to file an insurance claim. In reality, your car is fine, and the scammers sell it for a profit on the African side.

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About the Author

Dmitry Rashnitsov is a writer based out of Fort Lauderdale. His work has appeared in the "Sun-Sentinel" newspaper, "South Florida Blade" newspaper, "Cape Coral Daily Breeze," "411 Magazine," "South Florida CEO Magazine" and the Examiner.com web platform. He has a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Arizona.