How to Sell a Project Car

by Amrita Chuasiriporn

If you have a project car you love but no longer have time for, it may be time to sell it to another enthusiast. If you decide to sell, make sure you are as honest as possible in your advertising. Do not say that the car is nearly ready to drive if it is not anywhere near that point in the build. The target buyer of a project car is usually not the same as the target buyer for a family sedan who just wants to drive to work and pick up the kids with their used car purchase.

Research publications that specialize in your project car, and aim for the enthusiast market. If you have a classic Mustang, make sure to list your project car in the classifieds section of a classic Mustang magazine.

Broaden your classifieds marketing. To continue the example, advertising a classic Mustang in a classic Mustang publication makes sense. Advertising in a classic American muscle cars publication also makes sense, and broadens your potential market.

Advertise in online specialist forums and classifieds sites that cover your project car. eBay caters more to buyers who are looking for completed cars, so you may want to try other avenues of selling first.

Take good, high-quality photos of your project car. Make sure they are well-lit and in focus. If there are particular details (good or bad) of note, make sure to take close-up photos of them for potential buyers. Take a lot of photos because serious buyers will appreciate the extra care you have taken.

Offer to include any hard-to-find specialty parts and accessories that you may already have bought, but not yet installed. Take photos of these as well.

Make sure to say in the ad whether or not you have the title. With most project cars, you will already have the title. If for some reason you do not, make sure to mention the reason you do not succinctly in the ad. Serious buyers will want to know, and may not call you if you neglect to list any information about the title.

Include any photos and project logs you may have kept during the completed restoration phases. If you have not yet started the project, be prepared to explain to potential buyers why it never got off the ground. Everyone is busy, and there is no shame in explaining that your circumstances have changed. If anything, buyers may be sympathetic to your honesty.

Items you will need

About the Author

Amrita Chuasiriporn is a professional cook, baker and writer who has written for several online publications, including Chef's Blade, CraftyCrafty and others. Additionally, Chuasiriporn is a regular contributor to online automotive enthusiast publication CarEnvy.ca. Chuasiriporn holds an A.A.S. in culinary arts, as well as a B.A. in Spanish language and literature.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera working on a project image by leemarusa from Fotolia.com