How to Reset a Mazda SRS Light

by James Clark

The SRS light on a Mazda is designed to alert the driver to potential problems with the Supplemental Restraint System (SRS), which refers to the vehicle's air bags. The light can switch on for reasons unrelated to any defect in the air bag safety system, or it may illuminate because of a genuine problem that should be corrected. If you have recently performed certain types of routine work on the Mazda, such as replacing the car battery or installing a new stereo, chances are the SRS light merely needs to be reset. Try these steps to turn out the light; if it persists, go to a mechanic to have the safety systems checked out.

Turn the ignition key from the Off position to the ACC (accessories) position 10 times without actually starting the vehicle. In some cases, this will reset the SRS light and cause it to shut off.

Check the fuses in the fuse box under the steering column and replace any that are blown. A bad fuse can cause the SRS light to come on.

Disconnect the negative cable from the battery terminal using pliers or a wrench. Leave the cable disconnected for at least 10 minutes. This should cause all electronic systems to reset to the original factory default settings.

Disconnect the SRS air bag diagnostic connector, which is either under the dashboard on the driver's side or under the hood in the upper corner near the windshield on the driver's side. See photos in the Resources section.

Take the car to a Mazda mechanic with the computer diagnostic tool to reset the light. The electronic tool reads the Mazda computer codes and resets the light, although the cost of the diagnostic tool (approximately $1,000) is beyond the reach of most consumers. It is better to pay a mechanic to identify and resolve what could be a serious problem with your air bag safety system than to ignore the SRS light.

Warning

  • close Don't ignore an SRS light. You could be putting your life and the safety of your passengers at risk.

Items you will need

About the Author

James Clark began his career in 1985. He has written about electronics, appliance repair and outdoor topics for a variety of publications and websites. He has more than four years of experience in appliance and electrical repairs. Clark holds a bachelor's degree in political science.