How to Replace a TIPM Relay in a Chrysler Town & Country

by Contributor

The TIPM (Totally Integrated Power Module), located near the battery in the engine compartment of a 2008 Chrysler Town & Country, houses the fuses and relays that help regulate your vehicle's high current electrical system. If an associated high current device or system malfunctions or stops working, you may have a loose or damaged relay.

Turn off your Chrysler Town & Country van. Remove the keys from the ignition and pop your hood. Disconnect the battery to remove the hazard of electric shock.

Verify that the relay associated with your malfunctioning device/system resides in the TIPM of your Chrysler Town & Country by referring to the diagram/relay key embossed or imprinted under the TIPM's latching cover. If the relay doesn't appear on the diagram, refer to your owner's manual or a shop repair manual for the exact location of all fuses and relays within your vehicle.

Unplug the relay and clean, fix or repair any area of the relay or TIPM, as needed. In addition, consider resoldering your old relay's joints to restore it to working condition, as soldered joints on a relay's circuit board can suffer microscopic cracks that cause resistance and a voltage drop.

Push in the tabs that hold your relay circuit board in place beneath the relay cap, and then pull it straight out to completely remove and inspect the solder of a specific relay.

Plug in your old restored relay or your new replacement into the relay socket. Make certain the relay fits snug within the socket, as current running through a loose relay can cause the relay to overheat and the outer relay casing or TIPM cover to melt.

Replace the TIPM cover and reconnect the battery of your Chrysler Town & Country. Test your malfunctioning device or system to see if the new relay works.

Warning

  • close Never insert higher capacity relays or replacement wires into the TIPM to temporarily fix a relay-related malfunction, as these methods can cause an electrical overload that can start a fire or damage wiring.

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