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How to Replace the Headlight on a 1994 Camaro

by Allen Moore

1994 Camaros are the second model year edition of the fourth-generation pony car from Chevrolet. The complete redesign of the car in 1993 did not include changing to halogen-style headlamps. The 1994 Camaro is equipped with four sealed-beam-style headlamp bulbs that are held in place with Torx bit screws. Replacing the headlight bulbs is a fairly quick and easy task, but never attempt to remove the fasteners with a driver other than a Torx style driver.

1

Remove the Torx-head screws in the headlight aiming ring using the Torx driver. Set the screws aside so they do not get lost.

2

Pull the aiming ring open and remove it from the car. Be careful when setting it down to not damage the leveling device built into the ring.

3

Pull the headlight out of the mount by hand and unplug the wiring connector from the rear of the bulb. There are two locking tabs on the connector that must be gently lifted before the connector can be removed.

4

Make sure the part number on the replacement bulb matches the number on the old bulb. Plug the connector into the rear of the replacement bulb and position that bulb in the headlight mount. Make sure the connector is facing the same direction it was facing before removal.

5

Holding the aiming ring back in place, align the retaining tabs with the retaining mounts in the headlight assembly and hold the aiming ring closed over the replacement bulb. Thread in the Torx screws by hand, then tighten them in place with the Torx driver.

Warning

  • Never replace a high-beam bulb with a low-beam bulb or vice versa. The bulbs look identical upon first inspection but are differentiated by the part number. High-beam bulbs will have the letter ā€œUā€ in the part number, and low-beam bulbs will have the letter ā€œL."

Items you will need

About the Author

Allen Moore's career includes awards in poetry and creative fiction, published lyrics, fiction books and nonfiction articles as well as a master certification in automotive service from the Ford Motor Company. Moore is a contributing writer for RF365.com and various other websites, a ghostwriter for Rainbow Writing and has over a dozen works of fiction currently in print.

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