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How to Replace the Rotors on a 1996 Chevrolet 1500 Two-Wheel Drive

by Russell Wood

The stock rotors on a 1996 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 two-wheel drive spin with the wheels and wear down with every stop you make. Over time, the rotors will wear down with the brake pads. When it comes time to change the pads, you should remove the rotors at the same time and either get them turned or replace them entirely. Should you decide to replace them, you can do so at home with a little bit of work.

1

Lift up the front of the Chevrolet truck using the jack and set it onto jack stands to support its weight. Remove the wheels with the tire iron and move them out of the way. Use the hammer to tap off the center dust cap on the rotor. Unbolt the brake caliper from the spindle with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket, then suspend it by a bungee cord on the frame or front suspension.

2

Remove the cotter pin in the center of the rotor using the needle-nose pliers. Unbolt the center nut on the rotor with the 1/2-inch ratchet and socket, then pull off the washer and slide the rotor off the spindle. Discard or recycle the rotor and bearings.

3

Pack the replacement bearings with the bearing grease, then install the rear bearing into the rear of the rotor by hand and tap the seal onto the rotor with the hammer. Slide the rotor onto the spindle.

4

Slide the replacement front bearing over the spindle and into the rotor. Reinstall the washer, then reinstall the center nut. Tighten it down using the 1/2-inch ratchet and socket until it is tight, then back it off one-quarter rotation. Install the replacement cotter pin with the needle-nose pliers and reinstall the dust cap.

5

Reinstall the rotor using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket, then reinstall the wheels using the tire iron. Lower the truck off the stands with the jack.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Russell Wood is a writer and photographer who attended Arizona State University. He has been building custom cars and trucks since 1994, including several cover vehicles. In 2000 Wood started a career as a writer, and since then he has dedicated his business to writing and photographing cars and trucks, as well as helping people learn more about how vehicles work.

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