How to Repair the Throttle Position Sensor on an Isuzu Rodeo

by Don Bowman

The throttle position sensor on am Isuzu Rodeo is located on the throttle body. It is positioned directly opposite the throttle linkage, on the other side of the throttle plate. The throttle position sensor is a potentiometer that starts with .5 volts with the throttle closed. As the throttle is opened, the voltage increases and is monitored by the computer. The computer, in response to this signal, responds by adjusting the fuel injector on time and the spark advance.

Remove the air cleaner and the air induction hose leading to the throttle body by undoing the clamps and pulling them off. Remove the electrical connector from the throttle position sensor by pulling the connector apart.

Remove the throttle position sensor using either the ¼-inch drive Torx bits or a ¼-inch drive socket, whichever fits the particular year being worked on. There are two bolts in the sensor.

Remove the sensor by lifting it off the throttle body.

Install the new throttle position sensor with the left bolt hole slightly lower than the hole on the throttle body. Watch the two levers on the side. Push it on and then, while holding slight pressure on it against the throttle body, rotate it clockwise until the holes align. A slight spring pressure should be felt while attempting to turn the sensor counter-clockwise. The throttle position sensor is spring-loaded and the lever on the throttle body must be on the bottom side of the sensor lever. If no spring tension can be felt, take it off and try again, this time turn the sensor a little more to the left before installing it.

Line the holes up, then screw in the bolts and tighten them. Plug in the electrical connector and reattach the air cleaner.

Items you will need

About the Author

Don Bowman has been writing for various websites and several online magazines since 2008. He has owned an auto service facility since 1982 and has over 45 years of technical experience as a master ASE tech. Bowman has a business degree from Pennsylvania State University and was an officer in the U.S. Army (aircraft maintenance officer, pilot, six Air Medal awards, two tours Vietnam).