How to Remove Water From a Gas Tank

by Contributor

Water in a vehicle's gas tank can create major problems for a car. Water contaminates the fuel and prevents it from burning as powerfully as pure gasoline, which causes a vehicle's engine to use more fuel and operate inefficiently. Water can also corrode other parts of a car's engine, particularly the pistons and combustion chamber. Consequently, it is important to remove contaminated gas from a car's tank as quickly as possible.

Slide one end of the copper tube into one end of one of the pieces of 8-inch-long rubber tube. Seal the attachment area with the electrical tape.

Attach the other end of the rubber tube to one end of the fuel primer ball by sliding the end of the tube into the valve on the ball. Slide one end of the second piece of rubber tube into the second valve on the other side of the fuel primer ball. Seal all attachment areas with electrical tape. This apparatus will serve as the fuel siphoning device.

Slide the copper tube into the gas tank. Push the tube all the way through the fuel line until you feel it touch the bottom of the gas tank.

Place the end of the rubber tube into one of the empty gas tanks and squeeze the fuel primer ball. This will suck the gas and water out of the gas tank and into the can. Continue this process until the gas tank is empty.

Mix the 8 oz. bottle of dry gas and the 3 gallons of fresh gas with the watered-down gas in the gas can. Shake the can gently to ensure the fuel is mixed well. Pour the fuel from the gas can back into the vehicle's gas tank.

Tip

  • check If necessary, bend the bottom of the copper tube to allow it to fit more easily into the car's gas tank. For example, if the gas tank is V-shaped, you will need to bend 2 inches at the bottom of the tube in a 45-degree angle to follow the contour of the tank.

Warning

  • close Do not put the fuel back into the vehicle's gas tank if there is a substantial amount of water in the gas. Try to use a clear plastic gas can when siphoning the gas out of the tank so that you can observe how much water is in the gas. If the gas is basically clear, discard it because the dry gas will not be enough to absorb the water.

Items you will need

About the Author

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Photo Credits

  • photo_camera pumping gas image by Mat Hayward from Fotolia.com