How to Remove the Starter in a Miata

by Carl Pruit

The starter on the Mazda Miata will occasionally need to be removed because of wear or mechanical defect. The tight spaces around the starter underneath the engine will require that you use some dexterity and patience in removing the part. You can remove the starter in about an hour and save yourself the time and expense of having to take the vehicle into a shop and having someone else do the repairs for you.

1

Unfasten the negative battery cable from the Miata's battery with an open-end wrench.

2

Place a wood block behind the back tire of the Miata and loosen the lug nuts a couple turns on the front passenger tire of the vehicle with a lug wrench.

3

Raise the front passenger side of the vehicle up with a floor jack and place a jack stand under the front axle, lowering the car down so it rests on the jack stand.

4

Remove the front passenger tire from the vehicle by taking the lug nuts off with a lug wrench then set the tire and nuts aside in a safe place.

5

Locate the starter under the engine next to the transmission housing and find the electrical wires that run to the starter.

6

Remove the electrical wires connected to the starter with a socket wrench, unfastening the nuts holding the wires onto the starter.

7

Unfasten the three nuts holding the starter to the transmission with a socket wrench and detach the bracket by loosening the bolts with a socket wrench that secure the bracket around the starter.

8

Slide the starter out of the bracket and remove it from under the engine.

Tip

  • check Use extensions on your socket wrench, when removing the starter, in order to maneuver through the tight spaces.

Warning

  • close Let the Miata engine cool down, before attempting to remove the starter, in order to prevent being burned.

Items you will need

About the Author

Carl Pruit has been a freelance writer since 2005, specializing in service journalism and travel. His work has appeared on various websites. Born and raised in California, Pruit attended Contra Costa Community College in San Pablo, Calif. and received an associate degree in the administration of justice.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Zedcor Wholly Owned/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images