How to Remove a Factory Car Stereo

by Jesse James Dean

The car audio business is thriving. New models of car stereos are being released almost monthly, and it's no surprise, being that many people spend a good deal of the day in their vehicle driving to work or running errands. Whether you decide to upgrade your stereo system or have a vehicle with a broken stereo, removing a factory car stereo is relatively easy.

Locate the screws that hold the dash plate in place. Then, use the appropriate screwdriver to remove them by turning them counterclockwise until they come out of the holes. Remove the dash plate and set it aside.

Remove the stereo bolts. Depending on your vehicle model, there will be either two or four bolts that hold the stereo in place. Locate the bolts and use the appropriate size socket and ratchet to remove them by turning them counterclockwise. Then, slide the stereo out of the hole far enough to see the wires behind it.

Put your hand behind the stereo and grasp the antenna wire. This will be a black wire that is approximately 1/4 inch in diameter. The location will vary according to each vehicle. Then, use the other hand to hold the stereo and pull firmly on the antenna wire to disconnect it.

Disconnect the power. Locate the power plug to the stereo. The plug will generally have red and yellow wires running to it. Grasp one side of the plug with one hand and the other side of the plug with your other hand. Then squeeze them and pull at the same time.

Disconnect the speaker wires. There are generally two speaker wire plugs, front and back; they will look the same. These will be the only two remaining plugs and will need to be disconnected to remove the stereo. To do this, grasp each side of a plug, then squeeze and pull at the same time to disconnect them. Repeat this process with both plugs. When all plugs are disconnected, grasp the stereo with your hands and pull it out of the hole.

Tip

  • check There are eight speaker wires that are combined into two plugs; the colors of the wires will vary according to the vehicle manufacturer. In addition, the color of the antenna wire will also vary according to the model of the vehicle.

Items you will need

About the Author

Jason, who holds a Bachelor's Degree in journalism, hails from Espyville, PA. Troutman is not only a successful freelancer, he also worked for NASCAR teams including DEI and Joe Gibbs Racing. Troutman is editor-in-chief of Outlaw Motor Sports, a publication devoted to everything racing, from engine building to car design.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Photo courtesy of carstereohelp.com