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How to Remove Avalanche Cladding

by Jenny Carver

The cladding on a Chevrolet Avalanche is made of gray or black plastic material. Located along the bottom of the Avalanche, from front to rear on both sides, the cladding is quite noticeable. Some Avalanche owners remove the cladding and leave it off for a smoother look, while others remove the Avalance cladding to have it painted to match the truck and then re-installed. Removing all of the Avalanche cladding can be done in less than two hours.

1

Put on work gloves or leather gloves to protect your fingers from the sometimes sharp edges of the cladding. Thick leather gloves work best and protect your hands from the thin edges.

2

Pull the corner of the cladding, using your gloved hands, starting at the front end of the Avalanche. Pull the cladding away from the surface and slowly move your hands along the backside of the cladding. Your hand separates the cladding from the truck by lifting it up off of the surface. The cladding is stuck to the Avalanche by double-sided tape and will come off with steady force.

3

Remove the entire section of the cladding and then move to another section. The cladding looks like one long piece along the bottom of the Avalanche but is broken into sections with one on the front fender, one on each door and one along the length of the bed of the Avalanche. Once all of the cladding is removed, use a towel to apply some adhesive cleaner to the gummy areas of the double-sided tape that is left on the painted surface. Let the cleaner soak for a few minutes and then wipe it away. Do this until all of the tape is gone.

Tip

  • Look to see that the painted surface underneath the cladding is the same color as the other areas of the Avalanche. If your Avalanche is several years old, the paint underneath the cladding may look darker than the other parts of the truck.

Items you will need

About the Author

Since 1997 Jenny Carver has served as editor and freelance writer for many offline and online publications including lovetoknow.com, autotropolis.com, "Hoof Beat News," "Import Tuner" and others. Carver owns a custom automotive shop where she has been doing paint and body work, custom interior work and engine building for over 11 years.

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