How to Raise the Body on a Bobcat Skid-Steer

by K.K. Lowell

The body, properly called the operator cab, of a Bobcat Skid Steer must be in the raised position to access the hydraulic oil filter and control linkages when repair or maintenance is required. Luckily, the engineers at Bobcat did a good job of designing the cab mounts, making this a fairly straightforward operation.

Remove any loose objects, such as gloves, hard-hats or tools from the cab interior.

Locate the cab retaining bolts in the front corners of the cab. These are located in the bottom of the cab on both sides of the door opening.

Use the 19-mm socket to turn the nuts in a counter-clockwise direction to remove them. Remove the square washer located under each nut as well.

Stand on the top step of the loader and place one hand firmly on the bottom of both entry-assist hand rails. You must lift steadily on both rails to raise the cab. Be sure to lift the cab until it locks in place.

Lower the cab when done by lifting the cab slightly and pushing in on the lock mechanism on the gas cab support piston. This releases the the lock and allows the careful lowering of the cab.

Tips

  • check It is also possible to use a wrench to remove the cab nuts but the process will be considerably slower.
  • check If you do not have a 19mm socket or wrench, a 3/4-inch size will fit and work equally well.
  • check Lowering the cab may be easier if you have a helper release the lock on the support piston.

Warnings

  • close Bobcat cabs are heavy. Lifting one requires considerable effort, even with the assistance provided by the gas pistons. This is not a task for a person with a back problem.
  • close Do not place any part of your body under the cab area until the cab is in the fully raised position and supported by the lock on the gas support piston.

Items you will need

About the Author

K.K. Lowell is a freelance writer who has been writing professionally since June 2008, with articles appearing on various websites. A mechanic and truck driver for more than 40 years, Lowell is able to write knowledgeably on many automotive and mechanical subjects. He is currently pursuing a degree in English.