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How to Paint Rocker Panels

by Jenny Carver

Painting rocker panels can do several things. For one, rocker panels take most of the daily abuse against your car. From rocks chipping the paint to oil and road contaminants coating the surface, rocker panels are easily damaged. Painting damaged rocker panels can make your car look like new again. Another reason to learn how to paint rocker panels is that some vehicles come with black or unpainted rocker panels. Painting them can give your vehicle a more sleek, uniform look.

Outline the rocker panels with masking tape. Use the 120 grit sand paper to sand the area of the rocker panels that are to be painted. Sand with your hand on the back of the sandpaper, keeping the sanding motion flat and smooth. Once the entire area is dull, wipe it with wax and grease remover and a microfiber towel.

Place masking paper along the edges of the masking tape so that the surrounding surface of the vehicle won't be painted. Make sure to tape the edges of the paper down so that paint or primer can't get under it.

Spray a thick coat of primer over the previously sanded area. Allow the primer to dry for 30 minutes.

Use the 200 grit sandpaper to sand the entired area. Smooth the primer but don't sand through it completely. Sanding through a few small areas is okay. Wipe the area again with wax and grease remover.

Paint a total of two or three coats of paint on the rocker panels, allowing 15 to 30 minutes between each coat for the paint to dry.

Spray two or three coats of clear coat paint on the rocker panels, allowing 15 to 30 minutes for the paint to dry between each coat. Remove all masking paper and tape before the paint dries.

Tip

  • If you want to protect your rocker panels from future rust and drive through mud on a regular basis, use undercoating paint or bed coating paint. The same procedure is used for any type of paint.

Warning

  • Never paint inside an enclosed area. Paint in a well-ventilated area when sanding or painting.

Items you will need

About the Author

Since 1997 Jenny Carver has served as editor and freelance writer for many offline and online publications including lovetoknow.com, autotropolis.com, "Hoof Beat News," "Import Tuner" and others. Carver owns a custom automotive shop where she has been doing paint and body work, custom interior work and engine building for over 11 years.

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