How to Mix Nason Car Paint

by Contributor

Many people choose to do their own car paint jobs at home. Today's paint is both more complex and at the same time easier to use than ever before. New paints must adhere to stricter Environmental Protection Agency codes, and many manufacturers have started using water-based material. These modern paints have become much more user friendly with easier-to-follow mixing directions and measuring devices made easy to read and understand. A DuPont brand, Nason automotive paint, is just one such product.

Prepare your work area. The key to a quality paint job lies in the preparation. Rid your workbench of all unneeded materials and arrange your paint supplies and tools in a manner that makes it easy to reach them.

Read the directions. Reading and understanding the manufacturer's instructions is essential to correctly mixing your paint.

Decide on the amount of paint you need. Your paint sprayer will have a paint cup that is marked in ounces. Decide how many ounces of paint you want to mix and refer to the paint manufacturer's recommendations for mixing that amount. Your Nason mixing pail will be marked in 6:1:1 (paint, catalyst, reducer) ratio measurements for a number of amounts. You just need to choose the amount you wish to mix and pour in the materials.

Pour the paint into the mixing pail and fill it to the line of the number of ounces you wish to mix. Pour the catalyst into the mixing pail to the line designated for your mixing ratio. Finally, add the reducer to the designated line. For example, if you wanted to mix eight ounces of paint, you would pour the paint into the pail up to the first "8" line. You would add the catalyst to the second "8" line and then add the reducer to the third line marked with an "8." You now have a perfect 6:1:1 mix of paint, catalyst and reducer.

Stir the paint well with a stir stick and pour it into the spray gun.

Tip

  • check Mix only the amount of paint you will need. Once mixed, the paint can not be saved and it is rather expensive.

Warning

  • close Never substitute materials. Use only materials made to work together, or you will have very poor results.

Items you will need

About the Author

This article was written by the It Still Runs team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Runs, contact us.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera colorful paint tubes image by FrankU from Fotolia.com