How to Make a Heat Shield for an Air Intake

by Cassie Skelley

A heat shield helps to prevent warm air being sucked into your cold air intake. A heat shield is a small flat piece of aluminum that is placed near the filter and protects it from the heat the engine displaces while it is running. You can improve the performance of your cold air intake by increasing the cold air delivered to your car. Make your own heat shield at home.

Cut a piece of aluminum sheeting that is up to five inches by five inches using tin snips. Cut the aluminum sheeting as needed to allow for it to fit around the air filter properly.

Use sandpaper to smooth the edges of the aluminum sheeting.

Cut a hole in the center of the aluminum sheeting using tin snips to the appropriate diameter of your cold air intake pipe. Bend the metal sheeting so that it forms an angle around the air filter.

Insert the intake tube through the heat shield and attach you air filter as normal. Drill two small mounting holes on the side or the top of the metal sheet that matches the mounting hole distance on the L-bracket to allow for the L-bracket to be screwed onto. Place the L-bracket onto the drill holes. Insert screws with bolts and tighten so that the L-bracket is secure to the metal shield. This allows for you to mount the bracket to an area near the fender well in the engine bay to help keep the air filter mounted away from the engine.

Install the intake system by connecting the straight piece of intake tube to the throttle body, connect the second piece of intake tube which contains the MAF, or Mass Air Flow sensor and connect the elbow intake tubing that connects the air filter down into the fender well. Drill two small mounting holes in the engine bay near the fender well of your vehicle to allow the L-bracket to be fastened to. Be careful not to drill in to any wires or reservoirs. Insert screws through the L-bracket holes and tighten using bolts. The aluminum sheeting will act as a heat shield from the surrounding engine temperatures. This helps your cold air intake system absorb cold air only.

Items you will need

About the Author

Cassie Skelley has been writing articles about computers, electronics, video games and personal care for the Ikana Kai newsletter and Bon Losee Beauty College since 2005. Skelley majored in biology at Brigham Young University-Hawaii and in cosmetology at Bon Losee.