Lincoln Town Car Water Pump Removal

by Gracie Sprouse

The engine overheating on a Lincoln Town Car is one of the main indications that the water pump may be malfunctioning. The water and antifreeze mixture need to be distributed throughout the engine to keep the Town Car cool while it’s running. If the water isn’t moving, the engine will eventually overheat and stall out. There is also a serious risk of engine damage if this occurs, as some parts can melt or crack from excessive heat. The process for removing the water pump from a Lincoln Town Car is similar to most other cars. Luckily, the job can be finished in an afternoon.

1

Raise your Town Car's hood. Loosen the connections on the battery cable ends with a 1/2-inch wrench. Lift the cables off the posts of the battery by hand.

2

Drain the antifreeze from the radiator into a drain pan by loosening the drain plug on the bottom right corner of the radiator by hand. Place the antifreeze where children and animals cannot access it.

3

Remove the fan shroud as well as the bolts that hold the fan to the water pump using a 10 mm socket on the fan shroud bolts. Remove the idler pulley bracket and the belt from the air conditioner compressor using a 9/16-inch socket and ratchet. Loosen the bolts on the power steering pump with a 5/8-inch socket, then push down on the power steering pump to loosen the belt and remove it. The air conditioner compressor and the power steering pump are both located on the right front side of the engine block.

4

Remove the lower radiator hose from the water pump by loosening the clamp with a flat head screwdriver, then remove the bypass hose from the top of the water pump.

5

Remove all of the bolts that secure the water pump to the block of the engine, then remove the water pump. Use a razor blade knife to scrape the surface of the water pump jackets on the block and remove any remaining gasket material.

Warning

  • close Always allow the engine to cool off before attempting to open the radiator cap. Even if there is no water in the radiator, there is still a risk of getting burned.

Items you will need

About the Author

Gracie Sprouse has been writing professionally since 1976. Her areas of expertise are in antiques, crafts, real estate, income taxes and small businesses. Her education consists of an Associate of Applied Science with a business and accounting major from Piedmont Virginia Community College.

Photo Credits

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