How to Lift a Ford Escape

by Richard Ristow

Under-the-vehicle repairs require lifting a Ford Escape and crawling beneath the vehicle. This includes even simple maintenance tasks like changing the Escape's oil and oil filter. There are safe ways to raise an Escape--and there are methods that are dangerous. Not everybody has access to motorized, hydraulic lifts, nor should they get beneath a car supported only by a hand-cranked jack. One of the most reliable ways involves using jack stands.

Come to a full stop on a flat surface. Activate the emergency brake. If the Escape uses a stick shift, put it in reverse. If the Escape is an automatic, move the gear shifter into park. Turn the engine off and remove the key from the ignition.

Block the wheel diagonally opposite from the first wheel to be lifted. Place wheel chocks in front and in back of the this wheel.

Place the car jack at a suitable jacking point. The Escape has jacking points prefigured to fit the original Ford-supplied hand-cranking jack. Never try lifting the Escape by placing the jack under a differential.

Lift the Escape high enough so that a jack stand slides into a suitable, safe jacking point. Then lower the Escape onto the stand.

Repeat these steps until the vehicle is safely and securely on jack stands.

Tip

  • check A safe alternative to using jacks and jack stands involves using small-vehicle service ramps. This is is a very useful option for do-it-yourself oil changes. Place ramps in front of the two front tires. Slowly and safely drive onto the ramps. Park and pull the safety brake. Then, place wheel chocks behind the wheel on the ramp, and in front and behind the wheels not on the ramp.

Items you will need

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About the Author

Richard Ristow has written for journals, newspapers and websites since 2002. His work has appeared in "2009 Nebula Showcase" and elsewhere. He is a winner of the Science Fiction Poetry Association's Rhysling Award and he edits poetry for Belfire Press. He also holds a Master of Fine Arts from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and has managed an automotive department at WalMart.

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