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How to Install a Crankshaft Positioning Sensor on a 99 Dodge Dakota

by Lee Sallings

The crankshaft position (CKP) sensor in your 1999 Dodge Durango provides a cranking signal to the onboard computer that is used, along with the camshaft position sensor, to calculate correct ignition system and fuel injection function. Symptoms of a failed CKP sensor are an engine that won't start, with no spark to the spark plugs, or an engine that stalls when it gets hot but will restart after it cools off. The average do-it-yourself mechanic can replace this sensor in about an hour using basic hand tools.

Allow the engine to cool completely. Disconnect the negative battery cable using a 13 mm wrench and lay it beside the battery so it cannot accidentally touch the battery terminal and cause sparks.

Disconnect the electrical connector from the sensor located on top of the transmission bell housing angled slightly to the driver side of the truck. This connector is equipped with a red locking tab that must be pried out of the connector with a small screwdriver before the release can be pressed to remove the connector from the sensor.

Remove the two 13 mm bolts that attach the sensor to the bell housing. Pull and twist to slide the sensor out of the bell housing and lay it aside. Insert the new sensor into the bell housing. Reinstall the bolts and tighten them securely.

Plug the electrical connector into the sensor and slide the red locking tab into place.

Reconnect the negative battery cable and tighten it securely. Start the engine and test-drive the truck to verify it runs properly.

Warning

  • Wear safety glasses and work gloves when working around a running engine to prevent serious injuries.

Items you will need

About the Author

Lee Sallings is a freelance writer from Fort Worth, Texas. Specializing in website content and design for the automobile enthusiast, he also has many years of experience in the auto repair industry. He has written Web content for eHow, and designed the DIY-Auto-Repair.com website. He began his writing career developing and teaching automotive technical training programs.

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