How to Install a Rear Car Window

by Nathaniel Miller

The autoglass industry has changed a great deal. Vintage cars had autoglass installed simply by way of a rubber liner that fit into the frame of the car. The glass edge was then shoved into the rubber liner and held via friction. Obviously, this did not work well in collisions. Next, the industry used butyl tape to secure autoglass. Tape would be laid around the frame, followed by the windshield and completed by installing weatherstripping. However, as more vehicles moved to using autoglass as a constructural component, a new system was developed. The latest in autoglass technology uses urethane adhesive to secure the windshield to the frame. The autoglass comes with prefabricated weatherstripping installed. If you are going to replace the rear car window of your vehicle, this article can teach you how in as few as three steps.

Use the razor blade knife to slide along the perimeter of your old window and cut out the old caulking and weatherstripping. Urethane rubber is very strong, so this may take awhile. When you have the urethane completely cut, have a helper assist in lifting the old window out of the frame. Dispose of the window in an appropriate container.

Use the razor blade to clean all the urethane out of the window frame. You do not want any leftover urethane to be present as this weakens the integrity of the window mount. Apply the urethane primer that came with your window kit to the window frame and allow to dry.

Load the urethane caulking into the caulking gun and spread a thin bead of urethane along the inside of the window frame. Spread a line about the width of your pinky to ensure proper adhesion. Have a helper assist in hoisting the new window into place, carefully lining up the window edges and then mounting the window onto the bead of urethane. Allow to dry in a warm place for at least 24 hours.

Tip

  • check If your rear car window includes electric defrost or an antennae, you may want to have a professional installer tackle this project.

Warning

  • close Be certain about your placement as, once the urethane touches the glass, it is permanently stuck. If you need to reseat the glass, you may need to start from scratch.

Items you will need

About the Author

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Photo Credits

  • photo_camera http://www.kokomoglassandpaint.com/AutoGlass01.jpg