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How to Change the Rear Brakes on a Chrysler Sebring

by Contributor; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • Car jack

  • Wrench

  • Wire or small bungee cord

How to Change the Rear Brakes on a Chrysler Sebring. Brake pads are an important part of your Chrysler Sebring's braking system. They are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc or drum when the brakes are applied. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a 1/4 inch, or risk damaging your Sebring's brake discs.

Remove the Rear Brake Pads

Park your car on a level surface. Set the parking brake. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

Open the hood of your car. Locate the master cylinder and remove about two thirds of the brake fluid. A turkey baster is a good tool for this.

Raise the rear end of your car with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

Remove the caliper guide and lock pins. Slide the caliper off of the disc brake and suspend it near the disc brake with a small bungee cord or coat hanger. Suspend the caliper housing so that you do not damage the brake hose.

Take the brake pads, spring clip and shims out of the caliper.

Hand tighten the wheel lug nuts to the wheel studs to keep the rotor from moving while you work on the caliper.

Install Rear Brake Pads

Place a large C-clamp over the body of the brake caliper. Place the clamp ends against the rear of the caliper body and the outboard pad or a wood block placed against the caliper piston. Tighten the clamp until the piston is completely compressed into the caliper bore. Remove the clamp and the old pad or wood block.

Replace the caliper on the rotor. If you pivoted the caliper instead of removing it, pivot the caliper down to its original position.

Use high temperature silicone lubricant to lubricate the caliper guide and lock pins. Replace them in the caliper. Tighten the guide and locking pins to 32 foot pounds (43 Nm).

Replace the wheel assembly (tire). Lower the car to the ground. Press the brake pedal two thirds of its travel distance and release. Wait 15 seconds and depress the pedal the same distance. This seats the brake pads. Do this several times before trying to move your car.

Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder container. Add fluid to the container as needed. Reconnect the negative battery cable.

Tips

Depending on the model, the caliper can be pivoted up by leaving the upper pin in place.

Warnings

Brake fluid is an eye irritant and is hazardous if swallowed. Keep it away from your eyes. Always wash your hands thoroughly after you have been handling brake fluid. If brake fluid comes in contact with your eyes, promptly flush your eyes with clean, running water for at least 15 minutes. If your eyes are still irritated after you rinse them or if you ingest any brake fluid, get medical assistance immediately. The dust and dirt on the brake parts may contain asbestos fibers. Breathing in large amounts of asbestos fibers is hazardous to your health. Be extra careful when you are working with used brake parts. Don't use anything that cases friction or use compressed air when cleaning brake parts to avoid spreading dust and fibers. To clean brake parts, dampen them with water and wipe them with a clean, damp cloth. Throw away any cleaning cloths and debris in a sealed, impermeable container. Always follow Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) procedures when you are handling or throwing away anything that may contain asbestos fibers.

About the Author

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