How to Change the Brakes on Bikes

by Contributing Writer; Updated June 12, 2017

While traversing long highway stretches requires little braking, riding in an urban environment can quickly wear out the Suzuki bike brake pads. Replacing either the front or rear brake pads is made easier with the inclusion of a removable cover at the rear of both brake calipers. While the brake pads are removed, you will also want to clean the caliper pistons to prevent damaging the rubber seals that prevent brake fluid from leaking out of the caliper.

Under The Hood:

 How to Change the Brakes on a Goldwing 1800

Remove the two retaining bolts from the front of the brake caliper using a corresponding size Allen wrench. Pull the calipers off the rotor frame one at a time.

Pull both brake pads from the inside of the caliper and set them aside. Force the caliper piston back into the caliper using the handle on an Allen wrench.

Insert the new brakes into the caliper and place it back onto the rotor frame. Insert the mounting bolts and tighten them until snug.

Items you will need

  • Allen wrench set

  • Replacement brake pads

 How to Replace the Brakes on an Intruder 1500

Front Brake Pad Replacement

Pull the plastic caps off of the front brake caliper mounting bolts, located at the rear of the right front fork leg. Unscrew both caliper mounting bolts, using an 8 mm Allen wrench. Pull the front brake caliper away from the front fork leg and the front brake rotor by hand.

Pry the brake pad cover off of the back of the front brake caliper, using the tip of a flat screwdriver. Remove the hairpin clips from the ends of the brake pad pins, located at the inner face of the brake caliper. Pull the brake pad pins out from the outer face of the brake caliper with pliers. Pull the brake pads and both spring clips out of the brake caliper by hand.

Spray the front brake caliper's mouth and inner piston with a brake cleaning spray to remove loose brake dust and dirt. Gently scrub the inner piston and the surrounding area with a soft-bristled brush to remove heavy brake dust deposits. Wipe away any remaining brake cleaner with a shop towel.

Reinsert the old brake pads into the caliper mouth. Place a pry bar between the brake pads, then push the inner piston into the caliper body. Remove the pry bar and the old brake pads.

Coat the brake pad pins and the new brake pads' metal back plates with high-temperature grease. Slip the brake pads into the front brake caliper, then push the brake pad pins halfway into the caliper. Slip the spring clips into place between the brake pads and the brake pad pins. Push the brake pad pins completely through the front brake caliper. Push the hairpin clips into the holes drilled into the brake pad pin tips. Snap the brake pad cover onto the rear of the front brake caliper.

Slide the front brake caliper onto the front brake rotor and into place against the right fork leg. Screw the caliper mounting bolts into place, using an 8 mm Allen wrench. Tighten the bolts to 25.5 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and an 8 mm Allen socket. Push the plastic caps onto the caliper mounting bolt heads.

Pump the front brake lever repeatedly until the brake lever feels firm, indicating that the brake pads have closed around the front brake rotor.

Rear Brake Pad Replacement

Pry the brake pad cover off of the top of the rear brake caliper, located on the right side of the rear wheel, using the tip of a flat screwdriver.

Pull the hairpin clips off of the ends of the brake pad pins, located on the inner face of the rear brake caliper, by hand. Pull the brake pad pins out from the front of the rear brake caliper, using pliers.

Spray the rear brake caliper's inner piston with a brake cleaning spray to remove loose brake dust and dirt. Gently scrub the inner piston and the surrounding area with a soft-bristled brush to remove heavy brake dust deposits. Wipe away any remaining brake cleaner with a shop towel.

Reinsert the old brake pads into the caliper. Place a pry bar between the brake pads, then push the inner piston into the caliper body. Remove the pry bar and the old brake pads.

Coat the brake pad pins and the new brake pads' metal back plates with high-temperature grease. Slip the brake pads into the rear brake caliper, then push the brake pad pins halfway into the caliper. Slip the spring clips into place between the brake pads and the brake pad pins. Push the brake pad pins completely through the rear brake caliper. Push the hairpin clips into the holes drilled into the brake pad pin tips. Snap the brake pad cover onto the top of the rear brake caliper.

Pump the rear brake pedal repeatedly until the pedal feels firm, indicating that the brake pads have closed around the rear brake rotor.

Items you will need

  • 8 mm Allen wrench

  • Flat screwdriver

  • Pliers

  • Brake cleaning spray

  • Soft-bristled brush

  • Pry bar

  • High-temperature grease

 How to Change the Brakes on a Suzuki Bike

Park the Suzuki motorcycle on level ground, and allow both brake calipers to completely cool. Loosen the two mounting bolts on the face of the calipers with an Allen wrench.

Pull up on the calipers to remove them from the rotors and expose the brake pads. Pull the brake pads from the inside of the caliper with your hand.

Insert the Suzuki brake compression tool into the caliper. The metal arm with the flat plate on the end must be on the piston, and the metal plate on the opposite side must be on the wall of the caliper opposite the piston.

Turn the handle on the compression tool clockwise to push the caliper's piston back into the caliper. Remove the tool from the Suzuki's brake caliper.

Insert the new brake pads, and place the bike calipers onto the rotors. Tighten the mounting bolt, and put away your tools.

Items you will need

  • Allen wrench set

  • Suzuki brake compression tool

  • New brake pads

 How to Change the Brakes on a Yamaha Kodiak

Set the ATV's parking brake, using the shift lever on the left side of the ATV.

Loosen the lug nuts on both front wheels, using a 17 mm socket wrench and a long-handled socket wrench. Raise the front wheels off of the ground, using a service jack.

Unscrew the front wheels' lug nuts completely and pull the wheels off the front axle hub.

Reach around the right brake rotor and unscrew the caliper mounting bolts, using a 14 mm socket and a socket wrench. Slide the caliper off the brake rotor.

Unscrew the brake pad pins from the back of the caliper, using a 5 mm Allen wrench. Pull the brake pads out the caliper.

Separate the worn brake pads from their holder spring. Place a new set of brake pads around the holder spring and insert them into the caliper.

Insert the brake pad pins through the holes on the ends of the brake pads. Screw the pins into the caliper, using a 5 mm Allen wrench.

Slide the caliper onto the brake rotor. Bolt the caliper onto the front axle hub, using a 14 mm socket and a socket wrench.

Replace the left caliper's brake pads, following the method shown above. Reinstall the wheels and tighten the lug nuts, using a 17 mm socket and a socket wrench. Lower the front wheels to the ground and remove the service jack.

Items you will need

  • Service jack

  • 14 and 17 mm sockets

  • Socket wrench

  • 5 mm Allen wrench

  • Brake pads

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