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Hesston 6400 Engine Specs

by Sara Harvey

The Hesston 6400 is a grain windrower no longer manufactured by the company. It can still be found used, however, at dealerships or online. Hesston replaced the model with the 6450 windrower, placing the engine farther away from the operator. The company also outfitted the operator's platform with rubber cushion mounts to reduce engine noise. A windrower cuts hay or other grasses in large sections, setting them up into rows, or "windrows," for collection.

Engine

The Hesston 6400 is equipped with a Chrysler industrial, six-cylinder gas engine, model HB 225. The engine runs at 2,300 revolutions per minute (rpm) with no load, with a power of 48 kW. The fuel tank capacity is 110 liters.

The engine crankshaft drives the hydrostatic traction drive using two pumps, through a series of belts and sheaves. The windrower also has two traction drive wheels, two rear castor wheels, and a moveable steering wheel support column to control ground speed. Foot pedals operate the hydraulic header and reel controls.

The tractor is equipped with one multiple V and five single V belts, and lubrication takes an average 10 to 15 minutes.

Operation

The Hesston 6400 engine consumes an average 8 liters (30 gallons) of fuel per hour. The 110 liter tank allows for approximately 12 hours of running time before it needs refilling.

The combined noise of the engine and general operation of the tractor results in approximately 90 decibels at the operator's ear level, requiring protective ear coverings for extended exposure.

Miscellaneous

The Hesston 6400 engine is connected to a Sund-Strand Hydrostatic traction drive with a Borg-Warner No. 6 power wheel. The machine's table and reel lift are powered using an auxiliary pump in hydrostatic transmission.

The Hesston 6400 engine powers a set of brakes governed by a movable steering column and a lever-operated parking brake. The machine's steeling wheel is powered by hydrostatic pumps.

About the Author

Based in New York City, Sara Harvey has written about the environment, city planning, health and lifestyles since 1994. A former newspaper reporter, she now writes freelance full time. Her work has appeared in "Boho," a New York-based green fashion magazine, and several humor, parenting and business publications. Harvey has a bachelor's degree in print journalism.

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