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How to Disassemble a Ford Manual Locking Hub

by Sarah Davis

Manual locking hubs are used to engage or disengage the front wheels to the front axle shafts. This reduces wear and tear on the front axle. Hub components are often made of cast aluminum and can break easily. Locking hubs are disconnected when the vehicle is put into two-wheel drive, and reconnected for changing back to four-wheel driving. It is necessary to disassemble the manual locking hubs when they break or wear out and and need replacing.

Use a jack to raise the vehicle and bring the wheel up to a more serviceable height.

Remove the hub cap, if your truck has one. You may need to use a tire iron or a flat-head screwdriver to pry it off.

Locate the silver ring that has two tabs sticking out from its sides. This is the retaining ring. Pinch these tabs toward each other with your fingers to remove the ring. If it is too difficult to remove with your fingers, use a pair of pliers to pinch the tabs.

Grasp the lockout portion of the hub firmly with your fingers. Wiggle the lockout portion up and down and back and forth, pulling it away from the hub to remove it. You may need a rubber mallet to help gently knock it loose.

Tips

  • Make sure you have the necessary tools before starting the project.
  • After removal, make sure the parts are kept together and in order.
  • Manual locking hubs may vary by model of truck. Refer to the owner's manual for detailed information on the locking hubs installed on your truck.

Warning

  • Manual locking hubs are designed for off-road use and do not create independent wheel traction like differential locks.

Items you will need

About the Author

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