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Cummins 8.3L Diesel Engine Specs

by Martin Cole

The 8.3L QSC Diesel engine was developed by Cummings, an American engine manufacturer with over 80 years in business. For this particular engine they teamed up with Mercury Marine, an industry leader in marine vehicle performance that began in 1939. The result was an engine designed for both recreational and commercial boats.

Engine Specs

The 8.3 diesel is a four-stroke internal-combustion engine, meaning that intake, compression, combustion and exhaust strokes take place in two crankshaft rotations. The engine has six cylinders, which are positioned in an inline style, meaning the cylinders are aligned in a row. Each cylinder contains four valves, which boosts torque and acceleration. The engine has 540 propshaft horsepower at a maximum rate of 2,600 revolutions per minute.

Dimensions

The engine has a displacement--the volume swept by the pistons inside all of the cylinders in a motion from top dead center to bottom dead center--of 505 cubic inches. It has a dry weight of 1,975 lbs. The diameter of the cylinders, commonly referred to as the bore, is 44.9 inches. The stroke is 5.71 inches, that is, the length the piston travels in the cylinders.

Other Features

This Diesel engine has turbocharged aspiration and is cooled by a sea-water after-cooling system. The alternator has high output, meaning the mechanical energy is being converted to electrical energy at a high rate. It has rail fuel system, meaning the solenoid valves are being fed by a high pressure fuel rail. This prevents smoke while starting the engine without using air heaters. It also reduces noise and saves fuel.The pistons are cooled so they last longer and the engine has a belt guard that is resistant to corrosion. It also has electronic engine display.

About the Author

Based in the U.K., Martin Cole has been writing since 2009. His articles have been published in "The Evening Chronicle," "The Journal" and "The Sunday Sun." He holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from Northumbria University.

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