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How to Change an O2 Sensor on a Saturn Ion

by Russell Wood

The Saturn Ion uses multiple oxygen sensors to transmit information gleaned from the exhaust system to the engine control unit, to ensure that the engine runs properly and well. These sensors go out eventually, and when they do, it typically turns on the check engine light

1

Place the jack underneath the car and lift it up in the air. Set all four corners of the car down on jack stands, making sure that you have enough room to crawl underneath the car.

2

Locate the oxygen sensors on the exhaust. These are cylindrical pieces, similar to spark plugs in look, that stick out of the exhaust tubing three inches and have a wire leading out of them. These are the only electrical connections on the exhaust. One sensor is located at the base of the exhaust manifold where it contacts the exhaust system, and another approximately two feet down the exhaust tubing from the flange. Disconnect the electrical connection on the oxygen sensor that you want to replace with your hands.

3

Attach the oxygen sensor socket to the 3/8-inch ratchet, then slide the socket over the oxygen sensor. Remove it using the ratchet, then discard the old sensor.

4

Apply the anti-seize compound to the threads of the replacement oxygen sensor. Make sure you do not touch the sensor head itself with the compound. Thread the replacement sensor into the exhaust first by hand, then tighten it using the ratchet and socket. Reattach the electrical connection to the oxygen sensor, then use the jack to lower the car off of the stands.

Items you will need

About the Author

Russell Wood is a writer and photographer who attended Arizona State University. He has been building custom cars and trucks since 1994, including several cover vehicles. In 2000 Wood started a career as a writer, and since then he has dedicated his business to writing and photographing cars and trucks, as well as helping people learn more about how vehicles work.

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