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How to Change the Oil Filter on a Lexus ES 300

by David Marsh

The Lexus ES 300 uses an aluminum 3.0-liter, double-overhead-cam V-6 engine to produce 210 horsepower and 220 foot-pounds of torque. The engine sits sideways in the engine compartment and drives the front wheels through a four-speed automatic transmission. It carries 5 quarts of SG 5W-30 oil. The oil filter is easy to get to for the amateur mechanic. It is in front of the engine, under the exhaust manifold. The drain plug is toward the rear and in the center of the oil pan.

1

Lift the car onto the jack stands with the jack and put chocks behind the tires. Take off the oil cap. Slide a large pan under the oil pan and remove the drain plug with the socket wrench. When the oil is completely drained, put the pan to the side.

2

Examine the drain plug and the rubber grommet and replace them if they look damaged or worn. Reinstall the drain plug and grommet and tighten to firmly tight then another quarter turn.

3

Place a drip pan under the oil filter. Use the filter wrench to loosen and remove the oil filter.

4

Coat the threads and the rubber seal of the new filter with engine oil. Install it and screw it on until you feel the gasket make contact with the engine, then another 3/4 turn. Do not use the filter wrench to tighten -- hand-tighten only.

5

Pour five quarts of 5W-30 oil into the oil filler opening. Use a funnel to prevent spills. Replace the cap. Start the car and let it idle for two minutes. Examine the filter and drain plug for leaks. Check the oil level with the dipstick.

Items you will need

About the Author

In 1990 David Marsh began writing a column in the "Idaho Falls Post-Register" titled "Good Things," which presented restaurant reviews, sports analysis and movie criticism. Besides newspaper columns, Marsh researched police procedures for the Federal government. He has a Bachelor of Arts in administration and a Bachelor of Science in journalism from the University of Utah.

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