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BMW 745Li Specs

by John Papiewski

From 2002 to 2005, Bavarian Motor Works (BMW) sold its full-size 7-series four-door sedans as the 745i and 745Li models. The 745Li was the long-wheelbase version of the car. As the 7-series has represented BMW's flagship line, it had the highest level of comfort and performance equipment for the marque at that time.

Length and Weight

The 745Li's wheelbase was 123.2 inches, with an overall length of 203.5 inches, 5.5 inches longer for both dimensions than the 745i. Its overall height was 58.7 inches. The interior offered 39.2 inches of front head room and 41.3 inches of front leg room. The car tipped the scales at 4,464 lb.

Mechanical Details

The 745i and Li shared the same engine, a 325-horsepower, 4.4-liter V8, mated to a six-speed automatic transmission. BMW offered a V12 engine in another 7 series model, the 760i. The V8 had double overhead camshafts, a variable intake manifold and variable valve timing with a system BMW called VANOS, from the German "Variable Nockenwellensteuerung." The car had EPA ratings of 18 mpg in city driving and 26 mpg on the highway.

Safety Features

The BMW 7-series included several sets of airbags, including front airbags for the driver and passenger, and side head bags for the front and rear. Anti-lock disk brakes and Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) were standard equipment. Smaller safety touches included a safety battery terminal for jump-starting, active knee protection, internal trunk release handle and adaptive brake lights.

Electronics

The 7-series had an electronic system called iDrive, which consolidates control of the sound system, climate control and other functions into a center console-mounted controller knob and dashboard display monitor. Controls for the headlights, turn signals and windshield wipers remained traditional switches and stalks.

About the Author

Chicago native John Papiewski has a physics degree and has been writing since 1991. He has contributed to "Foresight Update," a nanotechnology newsletter from the Foresight Institute. He also contributed to the book, "Nanotechnology: Molecular Speculations on Global Abundance."

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