How to Add Air to Air Shocks

by Eli Laurens

Adding air to air shocks doesn't need to be complicated, and equalizing both shocks to each other will provide a smooth, level ride. The average backyard mechanic can add air to air shocks in about 10 minutes.

Check the current pressure of the air shocks. The shocks will have one or two check valves, usually placed near the rear of the vehicle. One valve will lead to both shocks with a T-valve in the center. Two valves will fill one shock at a time. The proper pressure of an air shock should be between 35 and 75 PSI. If it is any lower than this, the shocks will need to be filled with air.

Fill the shocks with air. A portable compressor is great for this task. Clip the fill tube to the shock's valve and turn on the compressor. Stop the compressor every twenty seconds and check the pressure of the shock. Air shocks do not need much time on a compressor to be filled, as the bags inside are relatively small.

Deflate the shock, if overfilled. A small knife or a pen can be used to press the center post at the center of the check valve stem, letting air back out. Check the pressure often, and be sure to get both shocks leveled to a common pressure. Having one shock at a higher atmosphere than the other will cause the vehicle to lean to one side or carry loads unpredictably.

Tip

  • check Use valve stem caps to prevent dirt and debris from clogging the valves.

Warning

  • close Do not inflate the shocks over 100 PSI.

Items you will need

About the Author

Eli Laurens is a ninth-grade physics teacher as well as a computer programmer and writer. He studied electrical engineering and architecture at Southern Polytechnic University in Marietta, Ga., and now lives in Colorado.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera arnottairsuspension.com