1964 Chevy Truck Specs

by Karen Taylor

Chevy used the name C/K for its full-size pickup truck line in the United States starting in 1960 and ending in 1999. The "C" indicated a conventional cab, while the "K" indicated a four-wheel-drive model. Chevy then renamed the pickup truck the Silverado.

Model and Production

In 1964, Chevy trucks featured a redesigned cab and a flatter windshield than the previous "wraparound" windshield. This design made it easier for the driver to enter and exit the truck. This was the first year for self-adjusting brakes. The 1964 Chevy truck is considered classic vintage by many collectors. All Chevy trucks in the 1960s featured independent front suspensions with the exception of four-wheel drive and forward-control models. After the modifications in 1964, the Chevy truck went mostly unchanged until 1966.

Engine

Chevy trucks produced in 1964 are part of the modern V-8 engine era of trucks. The standard engines were 230 and 292 cubic-inch, six-cylinder engines for all two-wheel drives. In 1964, these engines were available for four-wheel drive pickups also. The 283 cubic-inch, V-8 engine was optional. The V-8 engines did not begin to outsell the V-6 until 1967. Two-wheel drive models were rear-wheel drive.

Dimensions

The 1964 Chevy truck has a 115-inch wheelbase for the short version and 127 inches for the long bed, or long box model. It has a total curb weight of about 3,445 lbs. These trucks were on the heavy side as they were made mostly of steel. The exterior length is 199.5 inches and the exterior height measures 55.7 inches. Chevy trucks in 1964 were 74.5 inches wide.

Options

Only AM radio was available in Chevy trucks from 1955 to 1969. Between 1960 and 1966, chrome grills were not available on Chevy trucks. The standard was a white grill and deluxe trucks featured a high-shine anodized aluminum. Chevy trucks were available as smooth "Fleetside" or fendered "Stepside" versions in 1964.

About the Author

Karen Taylor is a visual journalist, page designer and horse-lover in central Indiana. She designs pages for an area newspaper including feature pages and page A1. She has had a passion for journalism her entire life and enjoys both the design and writing aspects of the industry. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Ball State University in visual journalism.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Scott Olson/Getty Images News/Getty Images