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How to Troubleshoot Torin Jacks

by Don Kress

Torin produces several jacks that range from 2- to 50-ton capacity. Troubleshooting these jacks is no different than troubleshooting any standard bottle jack, or any floor jack, for that matter. This is because the basic principle of hydraulic jacks is the same regardless of what kind of jack it is. Essentially, the jack is actuated, applying pressure to the hydraulic fluid, which in turn raises a steel piston within a sealed cylinder. Unfortunately, Torin jacks are not easily serviced at home, requiring professional rebuilding if any problems are evident.

Inspect the Torin hydraulic jack carefully to determine if you can see any places where hydraulic fluid may be leaking from the hydraulic cylinder. These will appear as dark brown spots on the exterior of the cylinder. If your Torin jack is slowly lowering your car to the ground after it has been raised up, it is likely that an "O" ring has been damaged, and the place where you see the dark brown liquid is where the "O" ring has been damaged. In these cases, Torin jacks are not serviceable at home. Take the jack to a certified repair professional before attempting to use the jack.

Twist the jack's release screw with the end of the jack handle all the way to the right. If the Torin jack won't raise up at all, and there does not appear to be any hydraulic leaks on the surface of the cylinder, this is the most likely problem. Turning the release screw all the way clockwise will tighten it and allow the cylinder to raise. Turning the release screw all the way counter-clockwise will loosen the cylinder.

Purge air from the Torin jack by unscrewing the pressure release screw all the way, and actuating the jack until hydraulic fluid comes out. This will rectify a spongy feel when the jack is in its fully extended position. When you have done this, however, it is best to add additional hydraulic fluid to the jack through the pressure release screw, and then tighten the screw securely.

Raise a vehicle with the jack to determine if your troubleshooting was effective. If you are still having problems with the jack, it is best to have it serviced by a qualified professional. Torin jacks are considered non-user serviceable, and attempting to repair one that is under warranty could void your Torin warranty.

Tip

  • Torin jacks have far more moving parts within the jack cylinder than you might suspect. It is more cost effective and you are less likely to lose parts of the jack if you have it professionally serviced.

References

About the Author

Don Kress began writing professionally in 2006, specializing in automotive technology for various websites. An Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certified technician since 2003, he has worked as a painter and currently owns his own automotive service business in Georgia. Kress attended the University of Akron, Ohio, earning an associate degree in business management in 2000.

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